Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘News’

Nintendo is still wii-ing over rivals

Computer game revenues in the US last year were eight per cent lower than in 2008, according to a market research company.

Retail sales of portable and console hardware, software and accessories managed to only scrape a measly $19.66 billion (£12bn) in 2009, compared to the $21.4 billion generated the year before.

The Nintendo Wii and DS were the big winners, moving 3.8 million and 3.3 million units, respectively. The DS made up for 17 per cent of total portable hardware sold in 2009.

However things began to look up for the retailers towards the close of the year. In December, the video game industry experienced its biggest sales month ever, beating December 2008 by four per cent.  The top three game titles for December all belonged to Nintendo, and each sold more than 1.5 million copies.

For the year, the only category to see an increase over 2008 was portable hardware, which was mainly up due to a seven per cent increase in average retail price. Most prices were lowered in the year which, researchers NPD say, explain the low revenues.

“Unit sales were down only six percent from last year. Average retail prices were down in all categories except for portable hardware and accessories, which led to the greater dollar sales decline,” said NPD analyst Anita Frazier.

“January and February were both up, and since the decline that began in March, only September experienced growth,” she said. “The big sales this month, particularly on the hardware front, are a positive move for the industry headed into what will hopefully be a recovery year in 2010.”

 “Clearly, 2009 was a tough year for consumers and the national economy. However, the bigger picture is one that underscores the industry’s strength; 2009 and 2008 were the highest grossing years in our industry’s history,” said president and CEO of the Entertainment Software Association, Michael Gallagher.

PC game software revenues were hit hardest with a 23 per cent drop, generating only $538 million (£329m) all year.

This article appeared on TechEye.net on Jan 18th 2010

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Nokia has already outlined its proposals towards the advanced user interfaces (UIs) of Symbian^4 handsets, before the Symbian^3 models have even released.

Simplification is Nokia’s keyword for the Symbian^4 proposals. It promises cutting-edge features and capabilities involving autosave with less user prompts. The proposed UI also claims to have a slicker feel with simplified applications with a more uniform look and a new interface layout, with just contacts, music, photos and applications available.

Nokia has submitted its UI proposal to the Symbian Foundation, and will now undergo open evaluation. However initial thoughts from the Symbian Community Forum critisied the proposals for being too mundane. One poster called Micky commented: “I think we need more WOW factor, and be distinguished from the competition.”

Another commenter, Petteri said: “I understand that these are v0.1 drafts but we should not forget that this change is crucial to the platform success so aiming higher should be encouraged.”

With the Symbian^3, the first open source release due in a couple of weeks, Nokia is hoping to regain ground on the Iphone and Android models that are top of the sector. However the new OS can be used on iPhones, Crackberries and Androids as well.

The Symbian Developer website reckons smartphones with Symbian^4 OS will hit the shelves by 2011.

kia has already outlined its proposals towards the advanced user interfaces (UIs) of Symbian^4 handsets, before the Symbian^3 models have even released.

Simplification is Nokia’s keyword for the Symbian^4 proposals. It promises cutting-edge features and capabilities involving autosave with less user prompts. The proposed UI also claims to have a slicker feel with simplified applications with a more uniform look and a new interface layout, with just contacts, music, photos and applications available.

Nokia has submitted its UI proposal to the Symbian Foundation, and will now undergo open evaluation. However initial thoughts from the Symbian Community Forum critisied the proposals for being too mundane. One poster called Micky commented: “I think we need more WOW factor, and be distinguished from the competition.”

Another commenter, Petteri said: “I understand that these are v0.1 drafts but we should not forget that this change is crucial to the platform success so aiming higher should be encouraged.”

With the Symbian^3, the first open source release due in a couple of weeks, Nokia is hoping to regain ground on the Iphone and Android models that are top of the sector. However the new OS can be used on iPhones, Crackberries and Androids as well.

The Symbian Developer website reckons smartphones with Symbian^4 OS will hit the shelves by 2011.

This article appeared on TechEye.net on Jan 18th 2010

Read Full Post »

Tuesday poll

Please put all other answers in the comments section.

Read Full Post »

This morning, in front of everyone, the Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and Tom Watson MP engaged in a bit of pushy-shovey (albeit virtually).

That conversation in full:

arusbridger: Daily Mail obssessed with idea of Guardian “putsch” (in collusion with BBC?). A question of media ethics, apparently. http://tiny.cc/7Wp3M

tom_watson: @arusbridger The Daily Mail are not the only people concerned. Many colleagues think you should report the news not make it.

arusbridger: @tom_watson er, so newspapers should stop writing editorials? Hmmm

tom_watson: @arusbridger Of course not but you have a unique status on the centre left. Why irritate your loyalists without allowing all sides a say?

arusbridger: @tom_watson so you didnt read Freedland or Milne or Bunting or McDonnell or Blunkett – all saying (in the Guardian) Brown should stay?

tom_watson: @arusbridger The only thing you haven’t done is publish his obituary. Be under no illusion that Labour readers think you have gone OTT.

arusbridger: @tom_watson love the thought of “labour readers” – as if they all think the same!

tom_watson: @arusbridger I know all of them in West Bromwich and they agree with me 😉 Love what you’ve done to paper but last week was too much.

arusbridger: @tom_watson Come into Guardian conference and debate it! 🙂

tom_watson: @arusbridger *gulps* Head into lion’s mouth. I gladly accept. Thank you.

After Watson accepted the invitation to the Guardian morning conference, which is a meeting of Guardian editors and journalists to discuss news  for the day, there has been increasing call for a live feed from the meeting. This has not yet been confirmed by the Guardian, but, thinking of the publicity, I can’t see that they won’t at least tweet it.

Read Full Post »

A British man has just accepted a job offer over 34,000 other applicants from all over the world to live, caretake and report from Hamilton Island, on Queensland’s Great Barrier Reef. Or to create a more visual idea of the ‘best job in the world’, he’ll be paid to live here:

Island Life

Now we know where to send our ‘congratulations parcels’ to…

Read Full Post »

The Standard says sorry

This is the new advertising campaign from the Evening Standard which went up all over London overnight:

The move to admit that the paper is out of touch was the brainchild of the new editor, Geordie Greig, after market research found that Londonders felt that the paper was negative, complacent and predictable.

Now this has caused somewhat of a fuss with Standard coloumist Roy Greenslade writing in the Guardian that  this will be seen by former owners, The Mail Group, as an open attack on their editorial style and previous choices in editors.  In his article he muses:

By saying sorry, Greig hopes not so much to distance his paper from its recent past as to shut the door on it.

Greenslade also points out the humbling circulation and readership figures when compared to free papers thelondonpaper and London Lite. Now surely this is where the real truth lies?

For example the Mail Group also owns the Metro in the morning, one of the most popular papers in the tube and also available in 13 other cities in the UK. Surely if they had got it so wrong with the Standard there would be similar problems here? But there don’t appear to be.

Could the answer be that, perhaps the Standard is just a reminder of another era? One where we had to pay for papers and spent time traveling home reading detailed analysis of the day’s stories? Sure, this will be what some people want, but it would appear that most people prefer the more tabloidy, more celebrity gossip fueled and less taxing journalism of the free papers. After all, at the end of a long day reading a series of serious essays isn’t always top of your agenda.

Which leaves the new Standard editor with a problem of targeting, how to maintain its image as the paper of culture, taste and so called ‘serious journalism’, while still tacking the free papers? I have no idea what will happen but it’s certainly going to be interesting to see the changes (or perhaps read all about it… sorry).

Read Full Post »